Trying to get property of non-object [ On /var/www/virtual/jpop.com/public_html/generatrix/model/youtubeModel.php Line 63 ]
Undefined variable: cookie_headers [ On /var/www/virtual/jpop.com/public_html/generatrix/external/magpierss-0.72/extlib/Snoopy.class.inc Line 438 ]
William Kincaid - JPop.com
Artist info
William Kincaid

William Kincaid

William Kincaid


William Morris "Monty" Kincaid (26 April 1895 – 27 March 1967) was an American flautist and teacher. Kincaid was born in Minneapolis but grew up in Honolulu, where he enjoyed diving for pennies in the harbor and learned the breath control that later served him well as a professional flutist.[1] In 1911, Kincaid went to New York, enrolling simultaneously in Columbia University and the Institute of Musical Art, where he studied flute with Georges Barrère. Read more on Last.fm
William Morris "Monty" Kincaid (26 April 1895 – 27 March 1967) was an American flautist and teacher. Kincaid was born in Minneapolis but grew up in Honolulu, where he enjoyed diving for pennies in the harbor and learned the breath control that later served him well as a professional flutist.[1] In 1911, Kincaid went to New York, enrolling simultaneously in Columbia University and the Institute of Musical Art, where he studied flute with Georges Barrère.[2] He received diplomas in 1914 and 1918,[3] and performed in the flute section of the New York Symphony from 1914 to 1919. During World War I, Kincaid served briefly in the United States Navy, after which he returned to the New York Symphony. In 1920, he played solo flute with the New York Chamber Music Society.[4] Philadelphia Orchestra[edit] After Leopold Stokowski dismissed André Maquarre during a rehearsal in April 1921, Kincaid was offered the principal flute position in the Philadelphia Orchestra, which he went on to hold for 40 seasons.[5] He retired from the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1960 at the mandatory retirement age of 65.[6] Curtis Institute of Music[edit] In either 1924 or 1928 (sources vary), Kincaid joined the faculty of the newly established Curtis Institute of Music, where his four decades of teaching would have a profound impact on orchestral flute playing in the United States.[2][3][4] Grandfather of the American Flute School[edit] William Kincaid is sometimes referred to as the Grandfather of the American Flute School. At least 40 compositions were dedicated to him, and 87% of all professional flutists living in the United States in 2003 could trace their heritage (through one or more of their teachers) to Kincaid.

Among Kincaid's many notable students were Julius Baker, Frances Blaisdell, Paul Lustig Dunkel, Doriot Anthony Dwyer, Katherine Hoover, John C. Krell, George Ellers Morey, Claire Polin, Elaine Shaffer, Felix Skowronek, John Solum, Mark Thomas, Albert Tipton, Robert Hugh Willoughby, and Charles Wyatt.[3][4] Platinum flute[edit] Kincaid's instrument featured a solid platinum body and silver French-style open-hole keys. Originally created for display at the 1939 New York World's Fair, the flute was purchased afterwards by Kincaid. The headjoint sported the Trylon and Perisphere logo, symbol of the 1939 fair, engraved by Verne Q.

Powell. The flute was considered so valuable that it remained under armed guard throughout the fair. Shortly before his death in 1967, Kincaid gifted the flute to his student, Elaine Shaffer. After her own death, the flute was auctioned by Christie's in 1986. The successful bidder was noted chemist, author and art collector Stuart Pivar, who paid $187,000 for the flute.

Pivar was accompanied by artist Andy Warhol the day of the auction. Today, the flute resides at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and is considered the most expensive flute in the world.[2] Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
Top Albums

show me more

showing 4 out of 5 albums
Shoutbox
No Comment for this Artist found
Leave a comment


Comments From Around The Web
No blog found
Flickr Images
No images
Related videos
No video found
Tweets
No blogs found