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Vadim Salmanov - JPop.com
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Vadim Salmanov

Vadim Salmanov

Vadim Salmanov


The composer Vadim Nikolayevich Salmanov (born in Saint Petersburg on November 4, 1912, died in Leningrad on February 27, 1978) is perhaps best known for his Symphony No. 2. His father taught him piano as a child, and at 18 young Salmanov was all set to go to the Leningrad Conservatory when he instead decided to study geology, working as a geologist until 1935, when he at last went to the Leningrad Conservatory, where he studied composition with Mikhail Gnesin. Read more on Last.fm
The composer Vadim Nikolayevich Salmanov (born in Saint Petersburg on November 4, 1912, died in Leningrad on February 27, 1978) is perhaps best known for his Symphony No. 2. His father taught him piano as a child, and at 18 young Salmanov was all set to go to the Leningrad Conservatory when he instead decided to study geology, working as a geologist until 1935, when he at last went to the Leningrad Conservatory, where he studied composition with Mikhail Gnesin. After graduating, he worked as a composer until the onset of World War II, when he enlisted in the Army. After the war, he set poems by Blok and Yesenin relating to the war.

Later on in his life, Salmanov set poems by García Lorca and Pablo Neruda, as well as Soviet poets. His Symphony No. 1 in D minor was written in 1952, it uses Slav folk melodies and a motto theme heard at the beginning of the first movement recurs in the Finale. All his Symphonies were recorded by Evgeny Mravinsky, and the 1976 Symphony No. 4 was, like the first, dedicated to Mravinsky. Although not nearly as political as Tikhon Khrennikov, Salmanov held various political appointments, including Secretary of a Composers' Union.

He also taught at the Leningrad Conservatory. His compositions also include six string quartets (1945-71) and two violin concertos (1964, 1974), among other music. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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