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The Ghost Who Walks - JPop.com
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The Ghost Who Walks

The Ghost Who Walks

The Ghost Who Walks


The Ghost Who Walks is the pseudonym of Neil McCormick, the chief music writer for the Daily Telegraph. Neil began his musical career at school, falling in love with rock and roll, fame, fortune and suffering from delusions of grandeur. By his own admission, he had "the Bug". Unfortunately, he attended Mount Temple School, which also gave birth to the biggest rock band of modern times, U2. In 2004, McCormick wrote the autobiography 'I Was Bono's Doppelganger' ('Killing Bono' in the US) Read more on Last.fm
The Ghost Who Walks is the pseudonym of Neil McCormick, the chief music writer for the Daily Telegraph. Neil began his musical career at school, falling in love with rock and roll, fame, fortune and suffering from delusions of grandeur. By his own admission, he had "the Bug". Unfortunately, he attended Mount Temple School, which also gave birth to the biggest rock band of modern times, U2. In 2004, McCormick wrote the autobiography 'I Was Bono's Doppelganger' ('Killing Bono' in the US), coming to terms with the chasm of fortune between himself and his classmates.

"I did have a life before U2" it begins. McCormick's musical career was not without success, with stints as the frontman or bassist of a succession of bands with his brother Ivan on guitar. Shook Up!, Yeah! Yeah! and the Modulators (featuring Larry Mullen Jr on drums) rallied a strong, mobile fan base who followed each band passionately, and each outfit garnered some positive press. However, commercial success never followed, often through no fault of the band members themselves. Meanwhile, Neil was having real success in journalism, having joined the Irish publication Hot Press as a graphic designer. From here he advanced to feature writing, reviews and band interviews, gaining valuable insight into both the music and media industries.

After moving to London, Neil wrote a series of influential features on the underworld, permitted access to Irish gang leader The General, and later The Monk, who superseded The General after his murder. These GQ features, alongside his past portfolio, attracted the attention of many publishers including the Daily Telegraph, who offered him the job as the replacement for Tony Parsons. The column 'Neil McCormick on pop' then followed. Though Neil gave up on rock superstardom, he never stopped writing music, and slowly recorded an album among company dedicated to the beauty of music, not to it's fleeting excesses. What resulted was stunning music with a soul, and this became the album Mortal Coil. Neil and Bono are best friends, and having reignited their schoolboy friendship, Neil can usually be found on the credits of most modern U2 films as official interviewer. The song Harm's Way from Mortal Coil was included by Mel Gibson on the soundtrack to his film The Passion of The Christ and in 2005 Neil responded to the July 7 bombings in London with the heartfelt and somewhat piercing People I Don't Know Are Trying To Kill Me. No new musical releases are known to date, but Neil continues to be featured in the Daily Telegraph.

Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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