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Sharakan Early Music Ensemble - JPop.com
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Sharakan Early Music Ensemble

Sharakan Early Music Ensemble

Sharakan Early Music Ensemble


The Sharakan Early Music Ensemble (Armenian: Շարական անսամբլ) was founded in 1991 to perform Armenian music of the Middle Ages, starting from the 5th century. It was created by Grigor Danielian, who has followed the age–old Armenian tradition of taking a pseudonym, in his case Daniel Erazhisht, for his musical work. The name Daniel Erazhisht literally means "Daniel the Musician", and was the name of an outstanding musical figure of the eleventh century. Read more on Last.fm
The Sharakan Early Music Ensemble (Armenian: Շարական անսամբլ) was founded in 1991 to perform Armenian music of the Middle Ages, starting from the 5th century. It was created by Grigor Danielian, who has followed the age–old Armenian tradition of taking a pseudonym, in his case Daniel Erazhisht, for his musical work. The name Daniel Erazhisht literally means "Daniel the Musician", and was the name of an outstanding musical figure of the eleventh century. The ensemble takes its name from "sharakan", the melismatic monophonic chant used in the liturgy of the Armenian Apostolic Church. Several guest musicians joined the Sharakan Early Music Ensemble on their album "The Music of Armenia vol.

2: Medieval Chant" on the Celestial Harmonies label; most notable among them is soprano Anna Mailan, who is considered the finest classical and operatic singer in Armenia today. She is in demand at major opera houses throughout Europe; her voice is heard on seven songs in this collection. Also appearing are Hovhannes Darbinian, a leading performer on the traditional Armenian tar, Ara Avanian, vocalist on the song Horzham; and classical pianist Margarit Sarkissian. The medieval songs of Armenia had their roots in both the sacred music of the Armenian Church and in the ancient bardic traditions of the Caucasus region.

While some of this music is still presented in its original state, many older Armenian works exist today because of the tireless work of the turn–of–the–century composer and musicologist known as Komitas. The Music of Armenia, Volume Two: Sharakan spans fifteen centuries of Armenian music, and Komitas' presence can be deeply felt in some of the arrangements. In many of these songs, though, conductor Daniel Erazhisht has wedded the exotic, often melancholy lyricism of the Near East to the classical purity of a European chamber ensemble, consisting of string quartet, voice, and flute. As a result, the sound is immediately accessible to Western listeners, even as the melodies capture the ear with their surprising arabesques.

Through Christianity, Armenia shares a common musical origin with Europe, especially in choral works for works of the established church. Due to geography, culture, and the pre-Medieval split of the Armenian Church from the Roman Catholic, Armenia is foreign and nearly Eastern. The musical result is a treasure, at times an unearthed gem of familiarity, springing as it does from the same basic form as European cathedral sources, and then siren calls of exotic charm. Portions sound as if right out of Gregorian songbook.

The similarity cannot be denied. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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