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Phil Nite

Phil Nite

Phil Nite


It’s late at night on Friday, turbid bulb light shivers as we climb the stairs of and old German apartment building. The owner of a tiny room in a shared flat takes out his keys and warns us: “There’s my neighbor, she’s a little insane – strolls across the corridor with a knife at night.” Lanky guy with tousled hair, dressed in tight female jeans and black sweater, opens plastic bag and gets a bottle of Belenkaya out of it. “Vodchillin’,” – he pronounces imperturbably, then pours the drink into plastic cups. Read more on Last.fm
It’s late at night on Friday, turbid bulb light shivers as we climb the stairs of and old German apartment building. The owner of a tiny room in a shared flat takes out his keys and warns us: “There’s my neighbor, she’s a little insane – strolls across the corridor with a knife at night.” Lanky guy with tousled hair, dressed in tight female jeans and black sweater, opens plastic bag and gets a bottle of Belenkaya out of it. “Vodchillin’,” – he pronounces imperturbably, then pours the drink into plastic cups. And that’s a sweet word to describe the situation: now, here’s the vodka, and here’s the “chill.” Vadim drinks up a shot and rushes to the computer to change a playing song.

He shuffles Dial’s minimal-techno with a live recording of soviet band Voskresenie. “Have you heard this shit? It’s The Hacker, he’s insane, extraordinary. He inspires me a lot.” Vadim Pytkin a.k.a. Phil Nite is a Russian musician, who has participated in multiple indie projects, has recently decided to depart from his rock’n’roll past: “Got a guitar? Stuck it up your ass and swing it once or twice,” – there’s the statement to be heard from him constantly, ever since he began to master synths.

This point is neither humanistic, nor tolerant, however it does describe him well: even after major changes in musical landscape’s reference points, he’s still nonconformist. “I’m still a punk and I only know how to make music, get drunk and fuck everything up.” These words are not unsubstantiated: last year’s single from his debut album “Перепады,” a track called “Фрустайлы” is all about hatred towards philistinism, average-man habits and stagnation. With that yelling: “C’mon, sweeties!,” onomatopoeia, interjections and Arabian-style synths, he’s not being funny at all. Quite the contrary, he’s being extremely serious, not trying to do the kitschy thing.

You can try to make fun of it, but he’s doing all that with such faith in himself, such belief in doing the right thing – the only thing you really can do is you can get bewildered and watch this spectacle of eccentricity the way some people enjoy observing madmen or reckless people. Despite the whole aesthetics of window stain, peeled off plaster and operating room light, the musical part here has gone pretty far from punk rock principles. Phil Nite’s music is something that cannot be done by some indie-rocker, even the one who’s experienced in party-rocking. Vadim’s scope of activity is a result of everyday struggle with synthesizers: there’s electro, techno, IDM pieces – and these are not just words to be added to Last.fm profile to make it look more subtle. You simply can’t attribute Phil Nite to any of these genres without causing damage to describing his style.

Take his track “Скажи Мне” (“Перепады” Album) – you can hear diffused ambient waves on the background, unexpected insinuating vocals lying on tangled uneasy keys, accentuated by drowning bass punches – you can’t cavil any of these elements. Phil Nite calls his music Logytech: “Love,”“Gypsy” and “Techno” – all in one word; basic keywords to get into his music, with “Gypsy” being probably the most important one here. It’s not an ethnic thing, however you can’t deny Phil Nite having some gypsy shade upon him: he’s hot-tempered, happy-go-lucky and madcap all at the same time. Add some diabolic, rustling whispering and shamanic rhythms following his persona everywhere – and you’ll get the picture. Year 2011 has been productive for Phil Nite: he has released four EPs and the whole series has effectively marked how easy it is for him to maneuver between genres and how far he can go in his stylistic inconsistency. You can hear shrill electro-rock (song “Love” – “Blood” EP), sensory adventures in sound design (track “R 2.1” – “Resurrection 2” EP) or dark and infernal IDM (song “Тени” – “Фрустайлизация” EP).

The track called “Night” from his “Resurrection 2” EP is an uplifting, cheerful techno song, a perfect one to be played at the height of an epic dj-set, right in between Paul Kalkbrenner and Dusty Kid. And if you don’t put your hands up in the air at 3:42, then what the hell are you doing at the dancefloor? Phil Nite’s music is grotesque, sharp and full of righteous angst: plastic tubes are playing, giggling dwarfs are dancing and “Dance with your love” line (song “Dance with your love” – “Перепады” Album) is being pronounced with the Richard D. James signature evil grin. The shared apartment, we earlier drank vodka with Vadim at, appears to be a perfect scene for Phil Nite’s music. Tough drinks, cold interiors, mad neighbors, discolored scenery on the wallpaper in the toilet.

Most of Vadim’s songs illustrate unsatisfied marginality and life’s sad absurd. If there’s dirt, then it’s deep under the nails, if there’s a nerve then it’s inflamed and incurable. Vitaly Selin, 2011 Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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