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Naná Vasconcelos - JPop.com
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Naná Vasconcelos

Naná Vasconcelos

Naná Vasconcelos


Naná Vasconcelos (August 2, 1944 – March 9, 2016) was a Brazilian Latin jazz percussionist, vocalist and berimbau player, notable for his work as a solo artist on over two dozen albums, and as a backing musician with Pat Metheny, Don Cherry, Egberto Gismonti, Gato Barbieri and Milton Nascimento. Vasconcelos was born in Recife, Brazil. Beginning from 1967 he joined many artists' works as a percussionist. Among his many collaborations, he contributed Read more on Last.fm
Naná Vasconcelos (August 2, 1944 – March 9, 2016) was a Brazilian Latin jazz percussionist, vocalist and berimbau player, notable for his work as a solo artist on over two dozen albums, and as a backing musician with Pat Metheny, Don Cherry, Egberto Gismonti, Gato Barbieri and Milton Nascimento. Vasconcelos was born in Recife, Brazil. Beginning from 1967 he joined many artists' works as a percussionist. Among his many collaborations, he contributed to four Jon Hassell albums from 1976 to 1980 (including Possible Musics by Brian Eno and Hassell), and later to several Pat Metheny Group works and Jan Garbarek concerts from early 1980s to early 1990s. In 1984 he appeared on the Pierre Favre album Singing Drums along with Paul Motian.

He also appears on Arild Andersen's album If You Look Far Enough with Ralph Towner. He formed a group named Codona with Don Cherry and Collin Walcott, which released three albums in 1978, 1980 and 1982. In 1981 he performed at the Woodstock Jazz Festival, held in celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Creative Music Studio. In 1998, Vasconcelos contributed "Luz De Candeeiro" to the AIDS benefit compilation album Onda Sonora: Red Hot + Lisbon produced by the Red Hot Organization. Vasconcelos was awarded the Best Percussionist Of The Year by the Down Beat Critics Poll for seven consecutive years, from 1984 to 1990. He was also honored with eight Grammy Awards. Vasconcelos was diagnosed with lung cancer in mid 2015. He died from the disease on March 9, 2016, in Recife. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nan%C3%A1_Vasconcelos Nana Vasconcelos is a magician with percussion instruments, especially the berimbau.

He has played with many prestigious musicians such as Pat Metheny, Gato, Barbieri, B.B. King, Jean-Luc Ponty, Don Cherry, Milton Nascimento, Trilok Gurtu, Lenine, Gilberto Gil, and David Byrne. ~Mondomix Percussionist Nana Vasconcelos has been an innovator in the fusion of Brazilian rhythms and jazz since the 1970’s. Born in Recife on the Northeast Coast of Brazil and, after a lifetime of playing throughout the world, his roots are apparent in everything he plays. When Nana was 12-years-old he began playing with his father, a guitarist, and in the city's marching band.

Prodded by intense curiosity and an inquisitive ear that led him from the music of Brazil's greatest composer, Villa Lobos, to Jimi Hendrix, Nana came to learn all the Brazialian percussion instruments and, by the early Sixties, came to specialize in the berimbau. He has taken this instrument far beyond its traditional uses and is acknowledge as its foremost player. After playing in every imaginable context from symphonic orchestras to street bands in his hometown, Nana moved to Rio de Janeiro and began to play with one of Brazil's greatest singers, Milton Nascimento. In 1970 the Argentinian tenor player Gato Barbieri was in Rio and invited Nana to join his band. They played in New York and then toured Europe, starting at the Montreux Jazz Festival where Nana caused a sensation.

When the tour finished Nana decided to stay in Paris. During his time in the city he made his first recording, “Africa Deus.” Nana returned to Brazil and recorded his album, “Amazonas,” and began a collaboration with guitarist Egberto Gismonti that lasted for eight years and produced three albums of duets. Back in New York he formed Codona with Don Cherry and Collin Walcott, as well as touring and recording with Pat Metheny's band. Since 1975 Nana has recorded with everyone from B.B.

King to Jean Luc Ponty to the Talking Heads, but has never allowed himself to become a studio musician. His contributions to each project are special and go beyond the usual role allotted a percussionist. While working with Gismonti, Nana recorded his third record, “Saudades,” in 1979, where he is accompanied by a symphony orchestra. In 1983 he released “Zumbi,” an album where he highlighted his work with voices and “body percussion”, using the sounds only he can make by slapping and otherwise provoking his own body. In 1983 he began to work with drum machines after being inspired by the break-dancing scene going on around him. He toured Europe with a group of break dancers from the South Bronx.

Nana's very original use of the drum machine is distinguished by an unusually careful tuning that makes it sound almost organic and by his ability to play it live, typing out polyrhythms instead of programming them layer by layer. In 1986 Nana Vasconcelos returned to Brazil for the first time in six years and his solo tour was enthusiastically received by enormous crowds. He continued to extend the field of his collaborations, being featured on soundtracks for films. Nana's work demonstrates the breadth of his musical talents. He has been a member of Norwegian saxophonist/composer Jan Garbarek's Quartet recording and touring extensively. He has continued to work with long-time collaborators Don Cherry and Trilok Gurtu, as well as forging new associations, for instance, with the Norwegian bassist Arild Anderson, with UK saxophonist Andy Sheppard, and with the French pianist Jean-Marie Machado.

Amongst many records he appears on Paul Simon's “Rhythm of the Saints” album. His own projects remain his first concern, however. His group, Bushdance, recorded for Antilles and worked extensively in Europe: and he is currently developing a unique solo performance, a theatrically staged piece that explores the full, fascinating range of sounds and songs that lie at the heart of his music, and which is based around his unique rapport with his audience. A further dimension to his work lies in his continuing committment to his work with children and people with learning difficulties, through workshop residencies in the UK and Italy. Biography courtesy of Saudades Tourneen Nano Vasconcelos started with his musical career at twelve years-old, with his father, in a little martial band in Recife. Gifted with an intense curiosity, which allowed him to go from erudite composer Villa-Lobos up to guitar player Jimi Hendrix, Naná learned to play practically all the percussion instruments.

In the 60s he specialized in the berimbau. He uses the berimbau in a very personal way, being recognized as one of the best players in the world. After the most different musical experiences, the musician moved to Rio de Janeiro and began to work with Milton Nascimento. In the 1970s the Argentinean saxophonist Gato Barbieri invited him to join his group. They played in New York and Europe, with great venues such as the Montreaux Festival Switzerland, where Naná delighted the audience and the critics.

At the end of the tour, Naná settled in Paris, France, during 5 years, where he recorded his first album Africadeus (1971). In Brazil, Naná recorded his second album Amazonas (1972). It was the beggining of a very successful partnership with composer and pianist Egberto Gismonti, during 8 years, which earned three albums entiled Dança das Cabeças, Sol do Meio Dia and Duas Vozes. When he returned to New York, together Don Cherri and Colin Walcott, they formed the group Codona.

Naná also recorded and toured with the guitar player Pat Metheny and his band. Working with an ecletic selection artists, Naná Vasconcelos recorded, among others, with B.B. King, with the French violonist Jean Luc Ponty and the American rock band Talking Heads, lead by David Byrne. Reminding his influences from Pernambuco, Naná idealizes the ABC das Artes Flor do Mangue project, his work with poor children. The American magazine Down Beat elected him seven times for best percussionist in the world. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..

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