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Nadsat Nation - JPop.com
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Nadsat Nation

Nadsat Nation

Nadsat Nation


Nadsat were always better live than in the studio and their recordings never did them justice. Live they were always loaded, out-of-tune as often as not, always full of energy, and always a blast to watch, sing along to, and spit beer on. For those of you that were there, you know what I mean. Nadsat Nation played the music they loved while staying true to their musical roots. Because of this, they were often accused of being derivative. But the band found a way to create their own unique sound Read more on Last.fm
Nadsat were always better live than in the studio and their recordings never did them justice. Live they were always loaded, out-of-tune as often as not, always full of energy, and always a blast to watch, sing along to, and spit beer on. For those of you that were there, you know what I mean. Nadsat Nation played the music they loved while staying true to their musical roots. Because of this, they were often accused of being derivative.

But the band found a way to create their own unique sound, maintaining a core backbone of melodic punk while exploring various musical genres. In a way, Nadsat Nation was formed as an attempt to bring some roots back into the local scene. After coming up in the late-eighties punk scene dominated by generic thrash, Misfits cover bands, and three letter acronym band names (DRI, GBH, JFA, MDC, DOA, etc) it was time for a return to a more musical and thoughtful brand of punk. It was also a time when ska was starting it's third wave revival. In fact, Ben and Gabe both played in a ska band in the late eighties, Etch-a-Sketch (which played in a Toronto Ska Fest featuring an early Bosstones). But Nadsat much preferred the rootsier sound of traditional Jamaican Bluebeat (and to a lesser extent British 2-Tone).

Similar to the Clash and Stiff Little Fingers, Nadsat tried to capture some of that essense in their music. There were also very few American Oi! bands to speak of at this time. Nadsat did their part to contribute to this then-lost genre with numbers like “Teenage Dream” and “Security in Numbers”. Many of the themes first tried out by Nadsat influenced future local bands, including the Fighting 69th and Ben and Gabe's future project, Pist ‘n' Broke. The material Nadsat produced ranged in topic as well.

Snotty rebellion, humor and self-parody, love, personal tragedy, dark and eery, defiance to the right-wing war machine (but not our brothers in the trenches), and deference to the old standards: sex, drugs, and rock‘n'roll. Most importantly, Nadsat believed in unity; racial unity and unity between punks, skins, and those who were neither. The band had members that were both punks and skins and lived by the “skunk's” credo. Nadsat formed at a time when this sort of unity was finally possible. Some of the pre-Nadsat crew (Ben, Gabe, Lindsay, Ollie, Dan Szetela, Dylan Goldman) entered the skinhead scene in the late eighties.

At this time, Michigan was dominated by white power boneheads and “white pride” fence walkers, even in the liberal bastion of Ann Arbor. Even some punks were walking around with white laces. But our crew had cut their teeth on classic punk, oi!, and ska and wanted none of the racist ways that boneheads (like the Northern Hammers) tried to force down their throats. Inspired by the music they listened to, visits to London, and the Sham 69 show at Blondies, they were determined to go against the grain. But in 1988, being a traditional skin was a pretty grim prospect. Later that year, Ben and Lindsay met Shane (future Lager Lads) and Dave from Windsor (both on the lamb from the Canadian authorities) who were also non-racist skins.

Lindsay and Gabe had previously met Howard and Brian from Toledo who later introduced them to an entire scene of anti-racist skins. This was when the first Sharp flyers started hitting Michigan from out of New York and Ohio. Gradually our lads started attracting like-minded fellows, many of whom helped chase the boneheads out of Ann Arbor and pave the way for future generations of traditional punks and skins: the boys from Toledo (Pat Lodge, Jodi, Sinbad, and the Majority of One skins), Bevan from Pittsburg, Brian Trimmer, Collin Crow, AJ, Tony Dread, Plastic Man Dan, Gus and Lito, the Gangster Fun crowd from Detroit, Pat (RIP) and Joe Bootboy, the Ambassadors SC, Bricks and Scotty Lyons, Luther and Kosta from Windsor, P.T. and John Hill, and many others. It was several years yet before a similar transformation started taking place in Detroit. Skinhead shows in Detroit were still pretty hairy in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s but have gotten much better since.

The era of the Falcon Club in Hamtramck, with appearances by Nadsat Nation, Pist ‘n' Broke, and the Lager Lads helped to cement the newly formed traditional scene into Michigan history. From http://www.myspace.com/nadsatnation with permission of the band. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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