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Jonathan Edwards (Theologian) - JPop.com
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Jonathan Edwards (Theologian)

Jonathan Edwards (Theologian)

Jonathan Edwards (Theologian)


Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was a preacher, theologian, and missionary to Native Americans. Edwards "is widely acknowledged to be America's most important and original philosophical theologian," and one of America's greatest intellectuals. Edwards's theological work is very broad in scope, but he is often associated with his defense of Reformed theology, the metaphysics of theological determinism, and the Puritan heritage. Read more on Last.fm
Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was a preacher, theologian, and missionary to Native Americans. Edwards "is widely acknowledged to be America's most important and original philosophical theologian," and one of America's greatest intellectuals. Edwards's theological work is very broad in scope, but he is often associated with his defense of Reformed theology, the metaphysics of theological determinism, and the Puritan heritage. Recent studies have emphasized how thoroughly Edwards grounded his life's work on conceptions of beauty, harmony, and ethical fittingness, and how central The Enlightenment was to his mindset. Edwards played a very critical role in shaping the First Great Awakening, and oversaw some of the first fires of revival in 1733–1735 at his church in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Edwards delivered the sermon "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God", a classic of early American literature, during another wave of revival in 1741, following George Whitefield's tour of the Thirteen Colonies. Edwards is widely known for his many books: The End For Which God Created the World; The Life of David Brainerd, which served to inspire thousands of missionaries throughout the nineteenth century; and Religious Affections, which many Reformed Evangelicals read even today. Edwards died from a smallpox inoculation shortly after beginning the presidency at the College of New Jersey (later to be named Princeton University), and was the grandfather of Aaron Burr. In defending Reformed Theology he distinguished himself as America’s preeminent theologian and initiated the first Great Awakening, i.e., a religious revival that swept 18th century colonial America. His treatise defending Determinism, "The Freedom of the Will", 1754, is considered Edwards' finest work, "The treatise is a monument of American philosophy," noted Christian History magazine (Vol. 4, No.

4, p. 19). John H. Gerstner writes, "In this book, Edwards annihilated false views of the will that prevailed in his century and in ours, in order that men may know how to believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and be saved. This profoundest of all Edwards' works is essentially, and intentionally, an evangelistic tract." Leading Reformed Pastor and Teacher, R.C.

Sproul also commented, "I believe this is the most important theological book ever published in America." Samuel Hopkins, Edward's friend and first biographer, has left us valuable information about Edward's preaching style. According to Hopkins, Edward's was a far cry from the stereotyped ranting, gesturing Evangelist. In fact, Edward's soft, solemn voice did not lend itself to loud tirades. Edwards was renowned as a preacher because (quoting Hopkins) "...his words were so full of ideas, set in such a plain and striking light, that few speakers have been so able to demand the attention of an audience as he.

His words often discovered a great degree of inward fervor, without much noise or external emotion, and fell with great weight on the minds of his hearers." Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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