Trying to get property of non-object [ On /var/www/virtual/jpop.com/public_html/generatrix/model/youtubeModel.php Line 63 ]
John Waters - JPop.com
Artist info
John Waters

John Waters

John Waters


There are two artists named John Waters. 1. John Russell Waters (born 8 December 1948, London) is a film, theatre and television actor and musician best known in Australia, to where he moved in 1968. He has been in the industry for over 40 years, and was part of the Australian children's series, Play School, for almost 20 years.[1] In 1990 David Stratton wrote that Waters "has been in more bad films than most other actors around". His first big break was in musicals Read more on Last.fm
There are two artists named John Waters. 1. John Russell Waters (born 8 December 1948, London) is a film, theatre and television actor and musician best known in Australia, to where he moved in 1968. He has been in the industry for over 40 years, and was part of the Australian children's series, Play School, for almost 20 years.[1] In 1990 David Stratton wrote that Waters "has been in more bad films than most other actors around". His first big break was in musicals, playing Claude in a Sydney production of Hair in 1969, then Judas in Godspell. Among his most famous roles are Sergeant Robert McKellar in the 1976 television series Rush (famously revoiced and parodied by The D-Generation as The Olden Days on their comedy programme The Late Show), Capt.

Alfred Taylor in the 1980 film version of Breaker Morant, and Pontius Pilate in the Australian concert production of Jesus Christ Superstar. Many Australians still remember him best from his nearly 20-year stint on the Australian children's series Play School (1972–1991). During his tenure with Play School, he narrated various children's video trailers for ABC-TV. Waters also appeared in the 1983 Australian miniseries All the Rivers Run as Brenton Edwards. He was in the original Australian production of They're Playing Our Song, which opened on 23 August 1980 at the Theatre Royal in Sydney. It starred Waters and Jacki Weaver, with Rhonda Burchmore as one of the "Inner Voices".

An Australian cast recording of the show was later released by Festival Records. In 1989, Waters won the AFI Award for Best Actor for his role as Garfield the Cat in the Frank Howson-written film Boulevard of Broken Dreams. Waters is also an accomplished musician, and has toured for many years with his one man show Looking Through a Glass Onion, a tribute to John Lennon featuring numerous examples of Lennon's music, words and images.[3] Waters also appeared on stage in a production of The Sound of Music, in which he played the part of Captain von Trapp, alongside Lisa McCune as Maria. In 2002, he had a role in the short-lived drama, Young Lions. He played Perry Luscombe in Fireflies, which lasted for only one season on ABC-TV in 2004. He has starred in advertisements for Bird's Eye frozen food products, and also joined the cast of All Saints in June 2006 as Mike Vlasek, the new head of surgery. He remained with the show until its cancellation in late 2009. In 2008, he played The Narrator in Richard O'Brien's Rocky Horror Show at Star City Casino, Sydney. Waters has toured around Australia in a critically acclaimed role alongside Brett Tucker in The Woman In Black. He currently appears on the Logie-award winning series, Offspring. 2. John Waters (born April 22, 1946, Baltimore, Maryland) is an American filmmaker, who became well known in the early 1970s for his intentionally transgressive comedies. Waters grew up in Towson, Maryland, a suburb of Baltimore.

His boyhood friend and muse Glen Milstead, later known as Divine, also lived in Baltimore County, Maryland, a short distance away. Waters' films would become Divine's primary star vehicle. Waters' early films were all shot in the Baltimore area with his company of local actors, the Dreamlanders. In addition to Divine, the group included Mink Stole, Cookie Mueller, Edith Massey, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, and others.

These early films were among the first picked up for distribution by New Line Cinema. Waters Premiers his films at the Baltimore Senator Theatre and sometimes at the Charles Theatre. Waters' early campy movies present filthily loveable characters in outrageous situations with hyperbolic dialogue. His early films, Pink Flamingos, Female Trouble, and Desperate Living, which he labeled the Trash Trilogy, pushed hard at the boundaries of conventional propriety and movie censorship. A particularly notorious final segment of Pink Flamingos, simply added in as a non sequitur to the end of the film, featured, in one take without special effects, a small dog defecating and Divine eating the dog feces. His 1981 film Polyester starred Divine opposite once-teen-idol Tab Hunter.

His films have become less controversial and more mainstream, although works such as Hairspray, Cry-Baby and Serial Mom still retain his trademark inventiveness. The film Hairspray was turned into a hit Broadway musical, which swept the 2003 Tony Awards, and a remake is currently being filmed. Waters' most recent film, the NC-17 rated A Dirty Shame, is a move back toward his earlier, more controversial work. He also had a cameo in Jackass Number Two, which starred Dirty Shame co-star Johnny Knoxville. He is currently a professor of Cinema and Subcultural Studies at the European Graduate School. [1] Read more on Last.fm.

User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
Top Albums

show me more

showing 4 out of 20 albums
Shoutbox
No Comment for this Artist found
Leave a comment


Comments From Around The Web
No blog found
Flickr Images
No images
Related videos
No video found
Tweets
No blogs found