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Jimmy McHugh - JPop.com
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Jimmy McHugh

Jimmy McHugh

Jimmy McHugh


James Francis McHugh (July 10, 1894 – May 23, 1969) was a U.S. composer. One of the most prolific songwriters from the 1920s to the 1950s, he composed over 270 songs. His songs were recorded by such artists as Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Billie Holiday, Dinah Washington, June Christy, Peggy Lee, and Ella Fitzgerald. After struggling in a variety of jobs, including rehearsal pianist for the Boston Opera House and pianist/song plugger for Irving Berlin’s publishing company Read more on Last.fm
James Francis McHugh (July 10, 1894 – May 23, 1969) was a U.S. composer. One of the most prolific songwriters from the 1920s to the 1950s, he composed over 270 songs. His songs were recorded by such artists as Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Billie Holiday, Dinah Washington, June Christy, Peggy Lee, and Ella Fitzgerald. After struggling in a variety of jobs, including rehearsal pianist for the Boston Opera House and pianist/song plugger for Irving Berlin’s publishing company, in 1921, at the age of 26, McHugh relocated to New York City.

Eventually finding employment as a professional manager with the prominent music publisher Jack Mills Inc., it was here that McHugh published his first song “Emaline”, and briefly teamed up with Irving Mills as The Hotsy Totsy Boys to write the hit song “Everything Is Hotsy Totsy Now”. This songwriting partnership was just the first of McHugh’s many illustrious collaborations, among them Ted Koehler (“I’m Shooting High”), Al Dubin (“South American Way”) and the great Harold Adamson (“It’s a Most Unusual Day”). As impressive as these master lyricists were, perhaps McHugh’s best symbiotic musical relationship was with the school teacher and poet Dorothy Fields. Having written material for many of Harlem’s Cotton Club revues, it was no coincidence that their first combined success would be the score for the all-black Broadway musical Blackbirds of 1928, which jump-started the fledgling duo’s career with the memorable songs “I Can't Give You Anything But Love,” “Diga Diga Doo” and “I Must Have That Man.” Other hits written for the stage were soon to follow, including what is arguably their most famous composition, 1930’s “On the Sunny Side of the Street” for Lew Leslie’s International Revue, which also contained the favorite “Exactly Like You”; “Blue Again” for The Vanderbilt Revue; and in 1932, “Don’t Blame Me,” which was featured in the Chicago revue Clowns In Clover. McHugh and Fields contributed title songs for films such as "Cuban Love Song", "Dinner at Eight" and "Hooray For Love", as well as “I Feel A Song Comin’ On” and “I'm in the Mood for Love” from 1935’s Every Night at Eight.

In the artistically fruitful years 1930 through 1935, McHugh and Fields wrote over 30 songs for the film world. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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