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Harold Burrage - JPop.com
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Harold Burrage

Harold Burrage

Harold Burrage


Harold Burrage (March 30, 1931, Chicago, IL, USA - November 26, 1966, Chicago, IL, USA) was an American blues, rhythm & blues and soul pianist and singer. Burrage did session work as a pianist in the 1950s and 1960s as well as recording under his own name. He released singles on Decca, Aladdin, States, and Cobra in the 1950s, and for Vee-Jay and M-Pac in the 1960s. Burrage's backing bands included the likes of Otis Rush, Willie Dixon, and Jody Williams, while Burrage supported Magic Sam, Charles Clark, and others as a pianist. Read more on Last.fm
Harold Burrage (March 30, 1931, Chicago, IL, USA - November 26, 1966, Chicago, IL, USA) was an American blues, rhythm & blues and soul pianist and singer. Burrage did session work as a pianist in the 1950s and 1960s as well as recording under his own name. He released singles on Decca, Aladdin, States, and Cobra in the 1950s, and for Vee-Jay and M-Pac in the 1960s. Burrage's backing bands included the likes of Otis Rush, Willie Dixon, and Jody Williams, while Burrage supported Magic Sam, Charles Clark, and others as a pianist. Burrage's only national hit was the 1965 Chicago soul song "Got to Find a Way", which reached #31 on the Billboard R&B charts. The following year Burrage died at the home of Tyrone Davis, a musician Burrage influenced. Pianist Harold Burrage started out singing blues and R&B during the 1950s and ended up as a linchpin of the emerging Chicago soul sound of the '60s; he made recordings in both styles and more than a few idiomatic shades in between.

Burrage mentored young soul singers Otis Clay and Tyrone Davis, but never had a chance to see them fully blossom. Burrage's first record was in 1950 with a jumping "Hi-Yo Silver" for Decca. Further singles followed for Aladdin and States before he joined Eli Toscano's Cobra label. His spell at the label saw him recruit some sterling guitarists on his sessions.

In 1956, Burrage cut the amusing "You Eat Too Much" for Cobra, backed by a solid combo featuring guitarist Wayne Bennett (Bobby Bland band) and bass legend Willie Dixon. For 1957's "Messed Up," he used Jody Williams while "Stop for the Red Light," his third Cobra 45, was a novelty complete with auto-wreck sound effects. "Betty Jean," his last Cobra single, is unabashed rock & roll, with Otis Rush on guitar. Burrage also served as a session pianist for Cobra, backing Magic Sam and Charles Clark.

He moved to Vee-Jay and cut a storming "Crying for My Baby" but by the early 60's he was with One-derful's M-Pac! subsidiary and had moved into a soul groove. His only national R&B hit (# 31) came in 1965 with the driving "Got to Find a Way" which was later revived by one of protégés, Otis Clay. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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