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Gábor Gadó - JPop.com
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Gábor Gadó

Gábor Gadó

Gábor Gadó


Gábor Gadó started his musical studies on the violin, then switched to the classical guitar. He graduated in 1983 from the Jazz Department of the Béla Bartók Music Conservatory as a student of Gyula Babos, following which he featured in the bands of the vanguard of Hungarian jazz musicians. Amongst his first partners were Róbert Rátonyi Jr, Ferenc Snétberger, Attila László, Béla Szakcsi Lakatos, Elemér Balázs and Kálmán Oláh. Later he appeared more and more frequently in international line-ups Read more on Last.fm
Gábor Gadó started his musical studies on the violin, then switched to the classical guitar. He graduated in 1983 from the Jazz Department of the Béla Bartók Music Conservatory as a student of Gyula Babos, following which he featured in the bands of the vanguard of Hungarian jazz musicians. Amongst his first partners were Róbert Rátonyi Jr, Ferenc Snétberger, Attila László, Béla Szakcsi Lakatos, Elemér Balázs and Kálmán Oláh. Later he appeared more and more frequently in international line-ups, for example alongside Gerald Veasley, Randy Roos and George Jinda. The first band he organised was called Joy, and recorded an album entitled Cross cultures. In 1991 he released Special time, the first album under his own name, then toured Europe with Nikola Parov.

In 1995 he moved to France, then briefly lived in London too. After five years the Gábor Gadó Quartet was formed in Paris: Matthieu Donarier (tenor saxophone), Sébastien Boisseau (double bass), Joe Quitzke (drums). The guitarist/composer appears with his French and/or Hungarian partners, or even solo, on several BMC albums, among others the outstandingly successful Orthodoxia (BMC CD 083), or Gábor Winand’s Corners of my mind (BMC CD 057), the latter chosen by the French magazine Jazzman as one of the best albums of the year in 2002. His next BMC release Psyche (BMC CD 120) comes out end of the year. In 2003 his achievements earnt him the Bobby Jaspar prize, awarded by the French L’Academie du Jazz each year to the European jazz musician of the year – the highest international recognition of his work to date. He is a sought-after guest at French and international festivals and clubs, and has performed at the following places: Festival de Châteauroux, Festival de Jazz de Montlouis/Loire, Rencontres internationales de Jazz de Nevers, Festival Crest Jazz Vocal, Festival de l’Hotel d’Albret (Paris), Tete Montoliu Jazz Festival (Barcelona), Festival de Jazz de Souillac, Festival de Jazz de Vitrolles, Fete de la musique de Téhéran, Mittel Europa Jazz Festival de Schiltingheim and the Paris Jazz Festival. ...

on him: I was less than thirteen when I played with my band at a dance course in a community arts centre in Pécs. It was no ordinary band: it included a surveyor, a disabled diabetic, a car mechanic and a butcher. It was the golden age of the beat generation, and like everyone else, I played the guitar, even behaving like a real showman on stage. To make a living, though, we were forced to play at weddings.

There we played Hungarian nóta (old popular songs), the songs of the Swabian and Serbian inhabitants of the region, and of course for young people the hits of the day. Then from the mid-seventies I worked in the catering industry. There was a centralised dispatching system: musicians playing light music were sent from a national centre to a suitable venue. Here there was an opportunity to play salon music and hits from Broadway.

In 1980 I came to Budapest, to the jazz department of the Bartók Conservatoire, the only place in the country where jazz (which, being a form of western music, was just about tolerated) could be studied. During my years of study I became a professional accompanist to famous performers. (written by Gadó Gábor) "GADÓ’s music embraces (“magába foGADÓ”) the musical thinking of the present age without limits or restrictions. It is delightful (“elraGADÓ”) music, poetry written in the first person. It cannot be placed on any stylistic shelf.

If one were to attempt to do so, it would rise and float above the shelves. GADÓ’s music is a fusion of the always prevalent intimate-modern and jazz. And it seems to me that it will be this fusion that will set the tone (“hanGADÓ”) in the years to come." (written by Eötvös Péter) "Gabor likes to think of and describe his music as supplication. This could seem pitiably naive, the self-induced ecstasy of a bigot. But in fact the opposite is true.

Gábor composes his music in the way that great mystics pray, for whom prayer is a way of keeping vigil, a form of vigilance rather than a form of devotion. His ascetism has taken him far in the knowledge of the language of harmony, which he combines with admirable skill with the modal roots of Hungarian music developed at the boundary of eastern and western cultures. His extraordinary lucidity creates remarkably appropriate structures, inhabited by our three marvellous free-thinkers. Taking us from dissonance to totally unexpected consonance, he disorients us until our head reels, sweeps us along until we are lost, holds us spell-bound and takes our breath away." (Franck Bergerot, Jazzman Magazine) Read more on Last.fm.

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