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Ernest Bloch - JPop.com
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Ernest Bloch

Ernest Bloch

Ernest Bloch


Ernest Bloch (1880–1959) was a Swiss-born American composer. Bloch's early works, including his opera Macbeth (1910) show the influence of both the Germanic school of Richard Strauss and the impressionism of Claude Debussy. His mature works, including his best-known pieces, often draw on Jewish liturgical and folk music. These works include Schelomo (1916) for cello and orchestra, the Israel Symphony (1916), Baal Shem for violin and piano (1923 Read more on Last.fm
Ernest Bloch (1880–1959) was a Swiss-born American composer. Bloch's early works, including his opera Macbeth (1910) show the influence of both the Germanic school of Richard Strauss and the impressionism of Claude Debussy. His mature works, including his best-known pieces, often draw on Jewish liturgical and folk music. These works include Schelomo (1916) for cello and orchestra, the Israel Symphony (1916), Baal Shem for violin and piano (1923, later version for violin and orchestra) and Avodath Hakodesh (Sacred Service, 1933) for baritone, choir, and orchestra. Other pieces from this period include a violin concerto written for Joseph Szigeti and the rhapsody America for chorus and orchestra. His works after World War II are a little more varied in style, though Bloch's essentially Romantic idiom remains.

Some, such as the Suite hébraïque (1950) continue the Jewish theme; others, such as the second concerto grosso (1952), display an interest in neo-classicism (though here too the harmonic language is basically Romantic, even though the form is Baroque); and others, including the late string quartets, include elements of atonality. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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