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Earl Palmer

Earl Palmer

Earl Palmer


Earl Cyril Palmer (October 25, 1924 - September 19, 2008) was an American drummer and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Palmer played on many recording sessions, including Little Richard's first several albums and Tom Waits' 1978 album Blue Valentine. According to one obituary, "his list of credits read like a Who's Who of American popular music of the last 60 years". Born into a showbusiness family the New Orleans and raised in the Tremé district Read more on Last.fm
Earl Cyril Palmer (October 25, 1924 - September 19, 2008) was an American drummer and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Palmer played on many recording sessions, including Little Richard's first several albums and Tom Waits' 1978 album Blue Valentine. According to one obituary, "his list of credits read like a Who's Who of American popular music of the last 60 years". Born into a showbusiness family the New Orleans and raised in the Tremé district, Palmer started his career at five as a tap dancer, joining his mother and aunt on the black vaudeville circuit in its twilight and touring the country extensively with Ida Cox's Darktown Scandals Review. His father was thought to be local pianist and bandleader Fats Pichon. Palmer served in the United States Army during World War II, eventually being posted in the European Theatre. His biographer states, Most Negro recruits were assigned to noncombatant service troops: work gangs in uniform.

"They didn't want no niggers carrying guns," says Earl; they carried shovels, and garbage cans instead. Earl's job, loading and handling ammunition was relatively technical, but his duty was clear: to serve white infantrymen. After the war ended he studied piano and percussion at the Gruenwald School of Music in New Orleans, where he also learned to read music. He started drumming with the Dave Bartholomew Band in the late 1940s. Palmer was known for playing on New Orleans recording sessions, including Fats Domino's "The Fat Man" (and all the rest of Domino's hits), "Tipitina" by Professor Longhair, "Tutti Frutti" by Little Richard (and most of Richard's hits), "Lawdy Miss Clawdy" by Lloyd Price, and "I Hear You Knockin'" by Smiley Lewis. His playing on "The Fat Man" featured the back beat that has come to be the most important element in rock and roll.

Palmer said, "That song required a strong afterbeat throughout the whole piece. With Dixieland you had a strong afterbeat only after you got to the shout last chorus. . .

. It was sort of a new approach to rhythm music." Reportedly, he was the first to use the word "funky", to explain to other musicians that their music should be made more syncopated and danceable. Palmer left New Orleans for Hollywood in 1957, initially working for Aladdin Records. For more than 30 years he was to play drums on the scores and soundtracks of many movies and television shows. His career as a session drummer included work with Frank Sinatra, Phil Spector, Rick Nelson, Bobby Vee, Ray Charles, Eddie Cochran, Ritchie Valens, Bobby Day, Don and Dewey, Jan and Dean, The Beach Boys, Larry Williams, Gene McDaniels, Bobby Darin, Neil Young and B.

Bumble and the Stingers, as well as jazz sessions with Dizzy Gillespie, Earl Bostic and Count Basie, and appearing on blues recordings with B.B. King. He was also in demand for TV and film scores. He remained in demand as a drummer throughout the 1970s and 1980s, playing on albums by Randy Newman, Tom Waits, Bonnie Raitt, Tim Buckley, Little Feat and Elvis Costello. His biography, Backbeat: the Earl Palmer Story, written by Tony Scherman, was published in 1999. In 2000, he became one of the first session musicians to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

In later years, he played with a jazz trio in Los Angeles. Palmer had three sons and four daughters by his first three marriages. He married his fourth wife, Jeline, in 2004. Earl Palmer died on September 19, 2008, at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84.

An official memorial website is at http://www.earlpalmermemorial.com/index.html Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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