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Dane Rudhyar - JPop.com
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Dane Rudhyar

Dane Rudhyar

Dane Rudhyar


Dane Rudhyar (March 23, 1895, in Paris – September 13, 1985, in San Francisco), né Daniel Chennevière, was a modernist composer and humanistic astrologer. He was the pioneer of modern transpersonal astrology. Rudhyar's own compositions tend to employ dissonant harmony, emphatically not of a systematic variety such as Charles Seeger's—Rudhyar was philosophically opposed to such a rigid approach. His musical thought was influenced by Henri Bergson and theosophy Read more on Last.fm
Dane Rudhyar (March 23, 1895, in Paris – September 13, 1985, in San Francisco), né Daniel Chennevière, was a modernist composer and humanistic astrologer. He was the pioneer of modern transpersonal astrology. Rudhyar's own compositions tend to employ dissonant harmony, emphatically not of a systematic variety such as Charles Seeger's—Rudhyar was philosophically opposed to such a rigid approach. His musical thought was influenced by Henri Bergson and theosophy, and he viewed composers as mediums, writing that "the new composer" was "no longer a 'composer,' but an evoker, a magician. His material is his musical instrument, a living thing, a mysterious entity endowed with vital laws of its own, sneering at formulas, fearfully alive." Rudhyar's most distinctive music is for piano, including his Tetragram (1920–67) and Pentagram (1924–26) series, Syntony (1919–24, rev.

1967), and Granites (1929). His works are almost all composed of brief movements—he felt that length and its attendant structural demands led to abstraction and away from the sensuous physicality of sound. He influenced several early-twentieth-century composers including Ruth Crawford and Carl Ruggles, members of the group centered around Henry Cowell known as the "ultra-modernists." Cowell paid homage to him with a solo piano piece, A Rudhyar (1924). Read more on Last.fm.

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