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Canary Girls - JPop.com
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Canary Girls

Canary Girls

Canary Girls


In 2011, in a converted 19th Century industrial smokehouse that doubled as a rehearsal space, Canary Girls began to find a new way of doing things. “We were uninspired by who we had become as a band,” said lead singer and keyboardist Bill Eager. “And we made a decision, as a band, together: To stop playing it safe, to forego who we had been, and to start over from scratch. To throw away all of our past songs, and to reinvent ourselves playing indie-electro pop with a live band that actually plays it all live. Read more on Last.fm
In 2011, in a converted 19th Century industrial smokehouse that doubled as a rehearsal space, Canary Girls began to find a new way of doing things. “We were uninspired by who we had become as a band,” said lead singer and keyboardist Bill Eager. “And we made a decision, as a band, together: To stop playing it safe, to forego who we had been, and to start over from scratch. To throw away all of our past songs, and to reinvent ourselves playing indie-electro pop with a live band that actually plays it all live. We’ve been friends and bandmates for a long time, and, well, we had a vision.” It was risky, but taking inspiration from the recent exciting direction of analog synth-based music and synth-pop that they all loved, the band decided that it was an opportunity: To take their friendship, their songcraft, and their creative talents and reinvent themselves with a new sound. And that sound is indeed big - smart and danceable - blending together the legacy of the lush, textured analog synthesizer sounds of such groups as Washed Out, Gary Numan, Neon Indian, and M83 work side-by-side with the dance-driven, guitar, bass and drums rhythm section of LCD Soundsystem, Talking Heads, and Kraftwerk.

Canary Girls’ music is catchy – there is barely a ballad in sight – and the hooks are as serious as the band is talented. It wasn’t easy, and that vision took some real ambition, says Eager, “We locked ourselves away for almost a year. We turned down shows. We bought a bunch of analog synths, both old and new.

We learned new software and programming. We pushed ourselves to not only think differently about music, but also about what we, ourselves, were doing as musicians.” The band took its time to do it right, carefully shaping its creative output, going through dozens of versions of each song until it met the high bar of craftsmanship the band had set for itself. Live, everything – keyboard, bass, drums, and guitar – is played by human beings. And the show is a good one, evidenced by the group’s willingness to take the crowd with them through songs that make you dance, played by people who take their musicianship seriously.

It’s not gone unnoticed, as the group has earned gigs at Town Ballroom, Nietzsche’s, Mohawk Place, DBGBs, and other Western New York venues, winning over crowds as a new band making more than a few new fans. New songs in hand, Canary Girls hit the studio, entering the esteemed GCR Audio in Buffalo to record the songs for its first full-length LP, Everything is Changing, to be released in March 2012. “I suppose when it comes down to it, we’re faithful to the past, but we want to create for the future. We want to stay true to our vision.

We had reformed simply because we wanted to do something different, something better. And that’s what we did,” says Eager. If the choice to challenge oneself to do better is always an option, then Canary Girls remind us all of the possibility that, with the right vision, everything can change. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..

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