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Caitlin Evanson - JPop.com
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Caitlin Evanson

Caitlin Evanson

Caitlin Evanson


“I want my music to open up hearts and minds wide enough to receive an emotional roller coaster ride and to connect on a personal level of empathy,” says violinist-singer/songwriter Caitlin Evanson. The 26 year-old emotes through her music intense imagery inspired by broken hearts, dysfunctional relationships, and a maturing realization that “everything doesn’t always have a happy ending.” With lyrics including “you have your hooks in me and honestly I'd rather not go free” and “pick your poison learn your lesson Read more on Last.fm
“I want my music to open up hearts and minds wide enough to receive an emotional roller coaster ride and to connect on a personal level of empathy,” says violinist-singer/songwriter Caitlin Evanson. The 26 year-old emotes through her music intense imagery inspired by broken hearts, dysfunctional relationships, and a maturing realization that “everything doesn’t always have a happy ending.” With lyrics including “you have your hooks in me and honestly I'd rather not go free” and “pick your poison learn your lesson,” Evanson shuns the suggestion of being just another face of melodic pop rock. Born and raised in Seattle, Evanson inherited her natural musical interest from her music professor father. Acquiring a violin at age four, she began to be classically trained eventually leading to studies under renown teachers such as Ivan Galamian (a colleague of Itzhak Perlman) and an assistant concert master position with the local youth symphony.

However, Evanson’s musical influences soon took a swift dramatic switch. “It unleashed a wrath unlike anything I had ever heard before,” recalls Evanson about the first time she heard Pearl Jam’s breaking single “Jeremy” on local rock station 99.9 KISW at age 13. She soon after purchased her first album: Pearl Jam’s debut Ten. Evanson’s new interest quickly advanced after her father purchased her an electric violin and amp for Christmas. By the 10th grade, Evanson was fronting her first band: Space Vomit (playing originals plus covers from Smashing Pumpkins, Led Zeppelin, and Green Day).

“We only played in a garage and lasted for around four months,” laughs Evanson recalling antic memories. After attending punk concerts by bands such as Bad Religion, Seven Year Bitch, and L7 and being bruised by the mosh pits of Seattle’s thriving grunge scene, Evanson’s artistic direction was never the same. While attending college at Western Washington University in 1999, Evanson joined the all-female folk rock act Late Tuesday. Through performances at local coffee shops, cafes, and clubs the band created a devoted following, encouraging the release of a self-titled album in 2001. Gradually, Evanson’s stylistic focus evolved. Pursuing a solo career was inevitable.

“I have always been wired to entertain,” admits Evanson. “I like being able to create a reaction on stage and see the response in the audience.” After moving to Nashville in 2002, Evanson quickly developed her career by recording demos, creating a band, sitting in on songwriter performances (including 2003 BMI Songwriter Of The Year: Jeffrey Steele), and rejecting lucrative record contracts to become the next country pop diva. “I have always constantly fought to be myself artistically,” says Evanson. “I know who I am and I know my desired sound.

If art is not presented by the person who created it, it is just an act read from a script. It’s very important to know yourself as an artist and to prevent yourself from becoming a marketing tool.” Evanson’s persistence was rewarded when Aware Records (John Mayer, Train) recently chose her song “Perfect Mess” to be featured on Aware 10, the label’s prestigious annual independent artist compilation, along with Marc Broussard, The Working Title, and Mae. Evanson’s catchy guitar licks, soaring vocals, piercing violin solos and benevolent lyrics are the result of expressing a heartfelt desire to share herself. “I want my music to reflect my life and for people to get to know me,” says Evanson.

“I believe in the gifts I have to offer.” Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
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