Trying to get property of non-object [ On /var/www/virtual/jpop.com/public_html/generatrix/model/youtubeModel.php Line 63 ]
Bone Parade - JPop.com
Artist info
Bone Parade

Bone Parade

Bone Parade


From Albany's Metroland: It’s rare when a band’s style heading on their MySpace page actually describes the way that band sounds—especially if they trend toward the experimental end of things—but “ethereal doom” seems to sum up Bone Parade rather well. A sense of unease (maybe even disease) arises from the opening swell of “Mandragora” and carries through the duration of Vollmondlieder, a five-track EP by married duo and Albany Sonic Arts Collective regulars Kevin Johnston and Erica Sparrow. Read more on Last.fm
From Albany's Metroland: It’s rare when a band’s style heading on their MySpace page actually describes the way that band sounds—especially if they trend toward the experimental end of things—but “ethereal doom” seems to sum up Bone Parade rather well. A sense of unease (maybe even disease) arises from the opening swell of “Mandragora” and carries through the duration of Vollmondlieder, a five-track EP by married duo and Albany Sonic Arts Collective regulars Kevin Johnston and Erica Sparrow. From the hand-sewn sleeve to the collaged liner-notes, this one’s a real-deal short-run underground CD-R release, that is, a genuine labor of love—which makes the music therein all the more disturbing. Johnston’s bleak drones pair scorched bass with windy atmospherics in a manner that owes more to doom metal acts like Sunn O))) and Boris than abrasive industrial bands like Einstürzende Neubauten. It’s more foreboding than combative, but it’s still the kind of stuff you’ll fear playing at high volumes while understanding that loud is the only way it really works. Sparrow takes the hooded occult ritualism of the music one step further with chilling churchy vocals.

On “Mandragora” she uses Johnston’s sonic canvas as the basis for an operatic German Lied. On “Selenite,” she floats while Johnston blacksmiths a thunderous dirge. However, it’s in the Gregorian incantation of “Remember/we are not this” on “The White Ship Has Sailed,” and the spoken-word narration of “Death and the Maiden” that the doom gets grounded in ideas. Oddly, and interestingly, this is pastoral music that credits the fall of humanity with the rise of the machine but uses both forces equally.

Ethereal doom, indeed. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
Top Albums

show me more

showing 4 out of 7 albums
Shoutbox
No Comment for this Artist found
Leave a comment


Comments From Around The Web
No blog found
Flickr Images
No images
Related videos
No video found
Tweets
No blogs found