Trying to get property of non-object [ On /var/www/virtual/jpop.com/public_html/generatrix/model/youtubeModel.php Line 63 ]
Undefined variable: cookie_headers [ On /var/www/virtual/jpop.com/public_html/generatrix/external/magpierss-0.72/extlib/Snoopy.class.inc Line 438 ]
Alexander Martovsky - JPop.com
Artist info
Alexander Martovsky

Alexander Martovsky

Alexander Martovsky


"Alexander Martovsky is a solo instrumentalist from the Belarusian capital of Minsk; he was born in 1987 and, despite his young age, is already keen to position his work within the grand sphere of so-called "classical crossovers." His online writings are almost nonexistent; any attempt to find those rare scribbles will first reveal his self-classifications in terms of numerous tags, labels, and pigeonholes. Given the chance, for example, to classify his work with generic tags on one Russian portal Read more on Last.fm
"Alexander Martovsky is a solo instrumentalist from the Belarusian capital of Minsk; he was born in 1987 and, despite his young age, is already keen to position his work within the grand sphere of so-called "classical crossovers." His online writings are almost nonexistent; any attempt to find those rare scribbles will first reveal his self-classifications in terms of numerous tags, labels, and pigeonholes. Given the chance, for example, to classify his work with generic tags on one Russian portal, Martovsky chooses every single one of them - all the way from "acid jazz" to "vocal house." Such, as we'll see, is the scale of his attempted "crossover." Equally portentous is a phrase that he employs at various locations in order to introduce his discography. Translated from Russian, it reads: "I penetrate [existence?] with an echo of sincerity, troubling the threads of the spirit." Understatement from this point onwards seems unlikely. The reason for considering Martovsky's work at present is that he has just published a four-track, twenty-minute instrumental EP through Minsk's Sgustok label. That organization has, over the last few years, established a reputation for a rather severe form of minimalism, epitomized by the sparing use of promo-texts and a strict continuity in graphic design.

This visual policy is well represented by the artwork (above) for Martovsky's newest tracks, known together as "M42." In other words, we might approach "M42" with a well-formed set of expectations. Martovsky, however, soon frustrates them in dramatic form, since the new EP - through a thunderous use of layered guitars - is happy to define itself as "post rock." Our author chooses a classification that sees itself in terms of departure from a prior style; it's a tag that shuns tags, so to speak. The EP sidesteps an electronic heritage merely in order to employ to bypass a guitar-driven legacy, also. Twice over, Martovksy adopts metaphors of exodus and willful, if not stubborn, movement. That celebration of constant departure is furthered in the track listings: "Aurora," "M42," "North Caucasus," and "Moon." The title track, we assume, continues a celestial, if not cosmic theme by invoking the Orion Nebula, known to some researchers as M42.

That nebula is sometimes categorized as a "nursery" for new stars - i.e., a realm in which nascent celestial bodies are endlessly coming into being. Put differently, the renown of M42 comes from the grand manner in which its bodies are in constant exit from an interstellar cloud - and thus start to exist. They are the embodiment of "departure," being born as they leave the cloud. Departure and development become synonymous. Martovsky's post-rock parallels are, therefore, easily justified.

He thinks of creative potential in terms of exit from (or an extension of) the highest extant points, such as mountain peaks, moons, and so forth. He hopes, through "classical crossovers," to depart from received norms and the benchmarks thereof. Some of his photographs show the blurred activity of that creative divergence. Thankfully, there are one or two instances of Martovsky systematizing these ideas. One of his brief blog entries gives us some thoughts he recently developed regarding Rudolf Laban, the father of international notation systems used to analyze dance. That notation, once refined, led Laban to see dance in terms of an obtainable harmony with one's surroundings.

Noiseless, paper-based notation, felt its author, could even make the need for a score obsolete. Silent movement could move beyond the linguistic or musical transmission of knowledge; it could exit - and therefore improve upon - the constraints of audible categorization. As Martovsky notes, "Laban believed that the human body could free itself from all previously learned steps and simply surrender to the environment." Beyond the heights of any received or classical norms of choreography, therefore, lay a freedom as yet unknown, a kind of "post-classical crossover," perhaps. The promising transition to quiet, kinetic forms of environmental concord was applied to schizophrenics. Laban, in treating those troubled individuals, sought a healthy sensation of balance through a managed system of "efforts." Between these opposites was an elusive golden mean. Space: Direct / Indirect Weight: Strong / Light Time: Sudden (or Quick) / Sustained Flow: Bound / Free The natural inclination of this terminology is not of accidental appeal to Martovsky; a related environmental aesthetic can be found amid his earlier releases. Take, by way of example, the image below that suggests a potentially fluid and fruitful extension of bodily existence to broader (quieter) domains.

That hushed symbolism is extended in the release title, also (no matter the problems with grammar). Martovsky, somewhat paradoxically, expects that such theories could be applied to the "movement" of music, too. More specifically, he hopes that Laban's classification could help his work attain a certain liberty either within (greater) space or away from the narrowness of tradition. Quoting Laban, he says: "Movement changes the body, mind, and spirit; likewise, the mind and spirit influence the body and its movement." Here various efforts and forces operate in perfect, mutual confluence. Movement changes the body, mind, and spirit; likewise, the mind and spirit influence the body and its movement Martovsky, sadly, sees little evidence of that harmonious acquiescence to one's natural (non-confrontational) context on the existing web venues for Slavic music.

Instead of cooperation and community, he encounters cliquish arguments and wordy, often narrow-minded assertions. Everybody holds their ground, grimly defending a genre or stylistically narrow outlook. Martovsky despairs: "Why the hell do people write this cr*p on line? Is it just some form of self-assertion? For a while I even turned off the 'comments' function on my site; people wouldn't write anything sensible, anyway. Sometimes, though, people write stuff that's so stupid, you just can't stop yourself from responding..." That linguistic to-and-fro, with each party refusing to concede, leads to naught. "[Argumentative] people will never agree with you.

It doesn't matter now much proof you offer [in defence of your compositions], those folks will always insist that they know how you should write your music... What really bugs me is when people start their observations with: 'In my humble opinion...' What that actually means is 'Hey, f***er, this is beyond debate, and you'll never win.'" For these reasons, despite the towering grandeur of Martovsky's EP, he continues to work in defense of a worldview that's tight-lipped and broad-minded. It imagines a realm where sympathetic, philosophically mobile individuals maintain a healthy modesty in the face of nature's promise. The quickest route to that outlook is a gaze fixed on the night sky as the sun goes down over Minsk - and M42 comes slowly into view." David MacFadyen, www.farfrommoscow.com Read more on Last.fm.

User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply..
Top Albums

show me more

showing 4 out of 20 albums
Shoutbox
No Comment for this Artist found
Leave a comment


Comments From Around The Web
No blog found
Flickr Images
No images
Related videos
No video found
Tweets
No blogs found